lunedì 18 settembre 2017

SIMENON SIMENON. “MAIGRET AND THE HEADLESS CORPSE” COMES OUT SEPTEMBER 7

Some details about the next Penguin translation for Anglophones 

SIMENON SIMENON. “MAIGRET ET LE CORPS SANS TETE” EN ANGLAIS EST ARRIVÉ LE 7 SEPTEMBRE 
Des détails sur la prochaine traduction de Penguin pour les anglophones. 
SIMENON SIMENON. "MAIGRET E IL CORPO SENZA TESTA" IN INGLESE E' ARRIVATO IL 7 SETTEMBRE
Qualche dettaglio sull'ultima traduzione di Penguin per gli anglofoni

Maigret and the Headless CorpsePenguin’s English translation of Simenon’s Maigret et le corps sans têtewill be available through Amazon.co.uk as of September 7, 2017. Both paperback and Kindle editions are being released. 
Because the paperback and Kindle editions will not be available from Amazon.com until April 3, 2018, the opportunity for early delivery of the paperback from the UK to the USA will appeal to some.
In distinct contrast, September 7, 2017 holds as the release date for the following other Amazon sources: Australia Kindle; France Kindle; Germany Kindle; India Kindle; Italy paperback and Kindle; Netherlands Kindle; Spain paperback and Kindle.
Unfortunately, the later April 3, 2018 release date pertains to these remaining Amazon sources: Brazil Kindle; Canada paperback and Kindle; China paperback; France paperback; Germany paperback; India paperback; Japan paperback and Kindle; Mexico paperback and Kindle 
Be aware the ISBN-13 for this new edition is 978-0241297261, which should facilitate searching for the book from various other sources. 
Maigret et le corps sans tête originally appeared in 1955. It first came out in English translation in 1967 as Maigret and the Headless Corpse with eight subsequent re-editions. Its translator was Eileen Ellenbogen then, and the translator for this new Penguin edition is Howard Curtis. 
The original work was the 75th in Simenon’s order of publication, and this work is the 47th in Penguin’s modern series of translations. 
This novel is interesting because the corpse found in a sewer is cut up into multiple pieces and it’s a man whereas Simenon writes: “It’s mostly streetwalkers that one cuts up into pieces.” Plus once more Maigret appears as “a mender of destinies” and is also compared to “a psychoanalyst.” The common conflict he has with superiors is seen again with Coméliau. Madame Maigret calls her husband Julesand “that happened only when shes feeling tender.” Finally, this is one of the few times Maigret gets really drunk. 

David P Simmons 

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